The Long Love that in my Thought doth Harbour

The Long Love that in my Thought doth Harbour

by Thomas Wyatt

The longë love that in my thought doth harbour
And in mine hert doth keep his residence,
Into my face presseth with bold pretence
And therein campeth, spreading his banner.
She that me learneth to love and suffer
And will that my trust and lustës negligence
Be rayned by reason, shame, and reverence,
With his hardiness taketh displeasure.
Wherewithall unto the hert's forest he fleeth,
Leaving his enterprise with pain and cry,
And there him hideth and not appeareth.
What may I do when my master feareth
But in the field with him to live and die?
For good is the life ending faithfully.

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Miscellany

Thomas-wyatt


Other poems by Thomas Wyatt (read randomly)


They flee from me that sometime did me seek
With naked foot, stalking in my chamber.
I have seen them gentle, tame, and meek,

My galley, chargèd with forgetfulness,
Thorough sharp seas in winter nights doth pass
'Tween rock and rock; and eke mine en'my, alas,

The longë love that in my thought doth harbour
And in mine hert doth keep his residence,
Into my face presseth with bold pretence

Farewell love and all thy laws forever;
Thy baited hooks shall tangle me no more.
Senec and Plato call me from thy lore

I find no peace, and all my war is done.
I fear and hope. I burn and freeze like ice.
I fly above the wind, yet can I not arise;

And wilt thou leave me thus?
Say nay, say nay, for shame,
To save thee from the blame

Forget not yet the tried intent
Of such a truth as I have meant;
My great travail so gladly spent,

Madam, withouten many words
Once I am sure ye will or no ...
And if ye will, then leave your bourds

Unstable dream, according to the place,
Be steadfast once, or else at least be true.
By tasted sweetness make me not to rue

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