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Seamus heaney

Seamus Heaney

POEMS
FOLLOWERS
8

On the grass when I arrive,
Filling the stillness with life,
But ready to scare off
At the very first wrong move.
In the ivy when I leave.

It’s you, blackbird, I love.

I park, pause, take heed.
Breathe. Just breathe and sit
And lines I once translated
Come back: “I want away
To the house of death, to my father

Under the low clay roof.”

And I think of one gone to him,
A little stillness dancer—
Haunter-son, lost brother –
Cavorting through the yard,
So glad to see me home,

My homesick first term over.

And think of a neighbour’s words
Long after the accident:
“Yon bird on the shed roof,
Up on the ridge for weeks—
I said nothing at the time

But I never liked yon bird.”

The automatic lock
Clunks shut, the blackbird’s panic
Is shortlived, for a second
I’ve a bird’s eye view of myself,
A shadow on raked gravel

In front of my house of life.

Hedge-hop, I am absolute
For you, your ready talkback,
Your each stand-offish comeback,
Your picky, nervy goldbeak—
On the grass when I arrive,

In the ivy when I leave.

1

I

A shadow his father makes with joined hands
And thumbs and fingers nibbles on the wall
Like a rabbit’s head. He understands
He will understand more when he goes to school.

There he draws smoke with chalk the whole first week,
Then draws the forked stick that they call a Y.
This is writing. A swan’s neck and swan’s back
Make the 2 he can see now as well as say.

Two rafters and a cross-tie on the slate
Are the letter some call ah, some call ay.
There are charts, there are headlines, there is a right
Way to hold the pen and a wrong way.

First it is ‘copying out,’ and then ‘English,’
Marked correct with a little leaning hoe.
Smells of inkwells rise in the classroom hush.
A globe in the window tilts like a coloured O.

All I know is a door into the dark.
Outside, old axles and iron hoops rusting;
Inside, the hammered anvil’s short-pitched ring,
The unpredictable fantail of sparks
Or hiss when a new shoe toughens in water.
The anvil must be somewhere in the centre,
Horned as a unicorn, at one end and square,
Set there immoveable: an altar
Where he expends himself in shape and music.
Sometimes, leather-aproned, hairs in his nose,
He leans out on the jamb, recalls a clatter
Of hoofs where traffic is flashing in rows;
Then grunts and goes in, with a slam and flick
To beat real iron out, to work the bellows.

                                 I
Vowels ploughed into other: opened ground.  
The mildest February for twenty years  
Is mist bands over furrows, a deep no sound  
Vulnerable to distant gargling tractors.
Our road is steaming, the turned-up acres breathe.  
Now the good life could be to cross a field  
And art a paradigm of earth new from the lathe  
Of ploughs. My lea is deeply tilled.
Old ploughsocks gorge the subsoil of each sense  
And I am quickened with a redolence  
Of farmland as a dark unblown rose.
Wait then... Breasting the mist, in sowers’ aprons,  
My ghosts come striding into their spring stations.  
The dream grain whirls like freakish Easter snows.

                                 II
Sensings, mountings from the hiding places,  
Words entering almost the sense of touch  
Ferreting themselves out of their dark hutch—
‘These things are not secrets but mysteries,’  
Oisin Kelly told me years ago
In Belfast, hankering after stone
That connived with the chisel, as if the grain  
Remembered what the mallet tapped to know.  
Then I landed in the hedge-school of Glanmore  
And from the backs of ditches hoped to raise
A voice caught back off slug-horn and slow chanter  
That might continue, hold, dispel, appease:  
Vowels ploughed into other, opened ground,  
Each verse returning like the plough turned round.

                                 III
This evening the cuckoo and the corncrake  
(So much, too much) consorted at twilight.  
It was all crepuscular and iambic.  
Out on the field a baby rabbit
Took his bearings, and I knew the deer
(I’ve seen them too from the window of the house,  
Like connoisseurs, inquisitive of air)  
Were careful under larch and May-green spruce.  
I had said earlier, ‘I won’t relapse  
From this strange loneliness I’ve brought us to.  
Dorothy and William—’ She interrupts:  
‘You’re not going to compare us two...?’  
Outside a rustling and twig-combing breeze  
Refreshes and relents. Is cadences.

                                 IV
I used to lie with an ear to the line
For that way, they said, there should come a sound  
Escaping ahead, an iron tune
Of flange and piston pitched along the ground,  
But I never heard that. Always, instead,
Struck couplings and shuntings two miles away  
Lifted over the woods. The head
Of a horse swirled back from a gate, a grey  
Turnover of haunch and mane, and I’d look  
Up to the cutting where she’d soon appear.
Two fields back, in the house, small ripples shook  
Silently across our drinking water
(As they are shaking now across my heart)
And vanished into where they seemed to start.

                                 V
Soft corrugations in the boortree’s trunk,
Its green young shoots, its rods like freckled solder:  
It was our bower as children, a greenish, dank
And snapping memory as I get older.
And elderberry I have learned to call it.
I love its blooms like saucers brimmed with meal,  
Its berries a swart caviar of shot,
A buoyant spawn, a light bruised out of purple.  
Elderberry? It is shires dreaming wine.
Boortree is bower tree, where I played ‘touching tongues’
And felt another’s texture quick on mine.
So, etymologist of roots and graftings,
I fall back to my tree-house and would crouch
Where small buds shoot and flourish in the hush.

                                 VI
He lived there in the unsayable lights.
He saw the fuchsia in a drizzling noon,
The elderflower at dusk like a risen moon
And green fields greying on the windswept heights.  
‘I will break through,’ he said, ‘what I glazed over  
With perfect mist and peaceful absences’—
Sudden and sure as the man who dared the ice  
And raced his bike across the Moyola River.  
A man we never saw. But in that winter
Of nineteen forty-seven, when the snow
Kept the country bright as a studio,
In a cold where things might crystallize or founder,  
His story quickened us, a wild white goose
Heard after dark above the drifted house.

                                 VII
Dogger, Rockall, Malin, Irish Sea:
Green, swift upsurges, North Atlantic flux  
Conjured by that strong gale-warning voice,  
Collapse into a sibilant penumbra.
Midnight and closedown. Sirens of the tundra,
Of eel-road, seal-road, keel-road, whale-road, raise  
Their wind-compounded keen behind the baize  
And drive the trawlers to the lee of Wicklow.  
L’Etoile, Le Guillemot, La Belle Hélène  
Nursed their bright names this morning in the bay  
That toiled like mortar. It was marvellous  
And actual, I said out loud, ‘A haven,’  
The word deepening, clearing, like the sky  
Elsewhere on Minches, Cromarty, The Faroes.

                                 VIII
Thunderlight on the split logs: big raindrops  
At body heat and lush with omen
Spattering dark on the hatchet iron.
This morning when a magpie with jerky steps  
Inspected a horse asleep beside the wood  
I thought of dew on armour and carrion.
What would I meet, blood-boltered, on the road?  
How deep into the woodpile sat the toad?
What welters through this dark hush on the crops?  
Do you remember that pension in Les Landes  
Where the old one rocked and rocked and rocked  
A mongol in her lap, to little songs?  
Come to me quick, I am upstairs shaking.  
My all of you birchwood in lightning.

                                 IX
Outside the kitchen window a black rat
Sways on the briar like infected fruit:
‘It looked me through, it stared me out, I’m not  
Imagining things. Go you out to it.’
Did we come to the wilderness for this?
We have our burnished bay tree at the gate,
Classical, hung with the reek of silage
From the next farm, tart-leafed as inwit.
Blood on a pitchfork, blood on chaff and hay,
Rats speared in the sweat and dust of threshing—
What is my apology for poetry?
The empty briar is swishing
When I come down, and beyond, inside, your face  
Haunts like a new moon glimpsed through tangled glass.

                                 X
I dreamt we slept in a moss in Donegal
On turf banks under blankets, with our faces  
Exposed all night in a wetting drizzle,  
Pallid as the dripping sapling birches.  
Lorenzo and Jessica in a cold climate.  
Diarmuid and Grainne waiting to be found.  
Darkly asperged and censed, we were laid out  
Like breathing effigies on a raised ground.
And in that dream I dreamt—how like you this?—
Our first night years ago in that hotel  
When you came with your deliberate kiss  
To raise us towards the lovely and painful  
Covenants of flesh; our separateness;  
The respite in our dewy dreaming faces.

Up, black, striped and demasked like the chasuble

At a funeral mass, the skunk’s tail

Paraded the skunk. Night after night

I expected her like a visitor.The refrigerator whinnied into silence.

My desk light softened beyond the verandah.

Small oranges loomed in the orange tree.

I began to be tense as a voyeur.After eleven years i was composing

Love-letters again, broaching the 'wife’

Like a stored cask, as if its slender vowel

Had mutated into the night earth and airOf California. The beautiful, useless

Tang of eucalyptus spelt your absense.

The aftermath of a mouthful of wine

Was like inhaling you off a cold pillow.And there she was, the intent and glamorous,

Ordinary, mysterious skunk,

Mythologized, demythologized,

Snuffing the boards five feet beyond me.It all came back to me last night, stirred

By the sootfall of your things at bedtime,

Your head-down, tail-up hunt in a bottom drawer

For the black plunge-line nightdress.

My “place of clear water”,
the first hill in the world
where springs washed into
the shiny grass

and darkened cobbles
in the bed of the lane.
Anahorish, soft gradient
of consonant, vowel-meadow,

after-image of lamps
swung through the yards
on winter evenings.
With pails and barrows

those mound-dwellers
go waist-deep in mist
to break the light ice
at wells and dunghills.

I

To-night, a first movement, a pulse,
As if the rain in bogland gathered head
To slip and flood: a bog-burst,
A gash breaking open the ferny bed.
Your back is a firm line of eastern coast
And arms and legs are thrown
Beyond your gradual hills. I caress
The heaving province where our past has grown.
I am the tall kingdom over your shoulder
That you would neither cajole nor ignore.
Conquest is a lie. I grow older
Conceding your half-independant shore
Within whose borders now my legacy
Culminates inexorably.

II

And I am still imperially
Male, leaving you with pain,
The rending process in the colony,
The battering ram, the boom burst from within.
The act sprouted an obsinate fifth column
Whose stance is growing unilateral.
His heart beneath your heart is a wardrum
Mustering force. His parasitical
And ignmorant little fists already
Beat at your borders and I know they’re cocked
At me across the water. No treaty
I foresee will salve completely your tracked
And stretchmarked body, the big pain
That leaves you raw, like opened ground, again

We have no prairies
To slice a big sun at evening—
Everywhere the eye concedes to
Encrouching horizon,

Is wooed into the cyclops’ eye
Of a tarn. Our unfenced country
Is bog that keeps crusting
Between the sights of the sun.

They’ve taken the skeleton
Of the Great Irish Elk
Out of the peat, set it up
An astounding crate full of air.

Butter sunk under
More than a hundred years
Was recovered salty and white.
The ground itself is kind, black butter

Melting and opening underfoot,
Missing its last definition
By millions of years.
They’ll never dig coal here,

Only the waterlogged trunks
Of great firs, soft as pulp.
Our pioneers keep striking
Inwards and downwards,

Every layer they strip
Seems camped on before.
The bogholes might be Atlantic seepage.
The wet centre is bottomless.

So winter closed its fist
And got it stuck in the pump.
The plunger froze up a lump

In its throat, ice founding itself
Upon iron. The handle
Paralysed at an angle.

Then the twisting of wheat straw
into ropes, lapping them tight
Round stem and snout, then a light

That sent the pump up in a flame
It cooled, we lifted her latch,
Her entrance was wet, and she came.

Air from another life and time and place,
Pale blue heavenly air is supporting
A white wing beating high against the breeze,

And yes, it is a kite! As when one afternoon
All of us there trooped out
Among the briar hedges and stripped thorn,

I take my stand again, halt opposite
Anahorish Hill to scan the blue,
Back in that field to launch our long-tailed comet.

And now it hovers, tugs, veers, dives askew,
Lifts itself, goes with the wind until
It rises to loud cheers from us below.

Rises, and my hand is like a spindle
Unspooling, the kite a thin-stemmed flower
Climbing and carrying, carrying farther, higher

The longing in the breast and planted feet
And gazing face and heart of the kite flier
Until string breaks and—separate, elate—

The kite takes off, itself alone, a windfall.

I can feel the tug
of the halter at the nape
of her neck, the wind
on her naked front.

It blows her nipples
to amber beads,
it shakes the frail rigging
of her ribs.

I can see her drowned
body in the bog,
the weighing stone,
the floating rods and boughs.

Under which at first
she was a barked sapling
that is dug up
oak-bone, brain-firkin:

her shaved head
like a stubble of black corn,
her blindfold a soiled bandage,
her noose a ring

to store
the memories of love.
Little adulteress,
before they punished you

you were flaxen-haired,
undernourished, and your
tar-black face was beautiful.
My poor scapegoat,

I almost love you
but would have cast, I know,
the stones of silence.
I am the artful voyeuur

of your brain’s exposed
and darkened combs,
your muscles’ webbing
and all your numbered bones:

I who have stood dumb
when your betraying sisters,
cauled in tar,
wept by the railings,

who would connive
in civilized outrage
yet understand the exact
and tribal, intimate revenge.

1

There, in the corner, staring at his drink.
The cap juts like a gantry’s crossbeam,
Cowling plated forehead and sledgehead jaw.
Speech is clamped in the lips’ vice.

That fist would dropp a hammer on a Catholic —
Oh yes, that kind of thing could start again;
The only Roman collar he tolerates
Smiles all round his sleek pint of porter.

Mosaic imperatives bang home like rivets;
God is a foreman with certain definite views
Who orders life in shifts of work and leisure.
A factory horn will blare the Resurrection.

He sits, strong and blunt as a Celtic cross,
Clearly used to silence and an armchair:
Tonight the wife and children will be quiet
At slammed door and smoker’s cough in the hall.